Category Archives: Travel art

Poetry: I remember You

I am miles away, away from sense,
I am a falling bridge a collapsing fence,
My muscles feel tense,
Especially when I remember you,
But still commit the sins I threw,
You are watching me and I knew,
My precious acts are few,
Nothing much than its due,
Whenever I remember you,
I weep the nearer I drew,
Fear gropes my heart-pump and chew,
Without a helper I still call upon whom I knew,
My Lord forgive the sins I blew,
One last glimmer of hope grew,
I remember you,
And tears rush down a little queue.

O’ God replenish my heart,
It feels like art,
This night I stand tall,
And for You I do this all,
I don’t know where my fate befall,
Forgive me,
This my only plea,
Before I am summoned at the cemetery,
The grave, my home to be

By Hafiz Heronet

Egyptian Gypsy Look!

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This month Salaam style explores the Egyptian gypsy through the fashionable art of a coined scarf and dark statement lipstick that makes the look colder then ever.

we love how this heritage look of a gypsy can be evolved into a fashion statement through the creating layering the hijab followed by a long length mango maxi dress with finely detailed print which adds towards the edginess of a fashionable gypsy aesthetic.

 

 

Behind Iraqi Art

To dedicate one’s life to art is a struggle even in the most stable society. There are inherent barriers that weed out those who aren’t serious. Those who remain are truly passionate and dedicated to an artistic and creative life. But, in times of upheaval, extreme chaos and war, even the most dedicated artist can be stifled by the immediate concerns of his or her life. Those who continue to produce despite the horror that surrounds them can truly be called an Artist

Unfortunately, artists are the first group to be abandoned in times of trouble. Art is seen as a luxury when starvation, misery and murder are the norm. A fundamental tenet is that art and artists are not a luxury, but are in fact the foundation of society. Art is essential to the survival of culture. It is the very medium of culture. If culture is the foundation of society, then how important the artist?

The role of artists becomes even more critical during times of social upheaval. Unfortunately, support for the arts disappears in these periods, and artists are marginalized. Iraqi Art strives to move the artist from the margins to the centre, to shine a light into the shadows, to give voice to those who have been muted.

Poetry: Lessons from a Donkey

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One day a farmer’s donkey fell down into a well. The animal cried piteously for hours as the farmer tried to figure out what to do. Finally, he decided the animal was old, and the well needed to be covered up anyway; it just wasn’t worth it to retrieve the donkey. He invited all his neighbors to come over and help him. They all grabbed a shovel and began to shovel dirt into the well. At first, the donkey realized what was happening and cried horribly.

Then, to everyone’s amazement he quieted down. A few shovel loads later, the farmer finally looked down the well. He was astonished at what he saw. With each shovel of dirt that hit his back, the donkey was doing something amazing. He would shake it off and take a step up.

As the farmer’s neighbors continued to shovel dirt on top of the animal, he would shake it off and take a step up. Pretty soon, everyone was amazed as the donkey stepped up over the edge of the well and happily trotted off!

MORAL : Life is going to shovel dirt on you, all kinds of dirt. The trick to getting out of the well is to shake it off and take a step up. Each of our troubles is a stepping stone. We can get out of the deepest wells just by not stopping, never giving up! Shake it off and take a step up. Remember the five simple rules to be happy:

1. Free your heart from hatred – Forgive.
2. Free your mind from worries – Most never happens.
3. Live simply and appreciate what you have.
4. Give more.
5. Expect less from people but more from yourself.

Author unknown

Beauty of Poetry: Take My Horse and Slaughter It

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You, and not my craze with conquest, are my wedding.
I left to myself and its match in your devil self
the freedom to comply with your demands,
take my horse
and slaughter it,
and I will walk like a warrior after defeat
without dream or sense …
Salaam upon what you desire of fatigue
for the captive prince, and of gold for the maidens
to celebrate the summer. And salaam upon you
abounding with suitors of every jinn and man,
for what you’ve done to yourself for
yourself: your hairpin breaks
my shield and my sword,
and your shirt button bears in its glare
the secret word of birds of every sort,
take my breath the way a guitar responds
to what you demand of the wind. All of my Andalus
is within your hands, so don’t leave a single string
for self-defense in the land of my Andalus.
I will realize, in another time,
I will realize that I have won with my despair
and that I have found my life, over there
outside itself, near my past
take my horse
and slaughter it, and I will carry myself dead and alive,
by myself…

خذي فرسي ….. واذبحيها
ل محمود درويش

خذي فرسي ….. واذبحيها

أَنتِ لا هَوَسي بالفتوحات , عُرْسي
تَرَكْتُ لنفسي و أقرانها من شياطين نفسِكِ
حُريَّةَ الامتثال لما تطلبين ,
خُذي فَرسي
واُذبحيها ,
لأَمشي مثلَ المُحَارِبِ بَعْدَ الهزيمةِ
من غيْرِ حُلم وحسِّ …
سلاماً ما تُريدين من تَعبٍ
للأَمير الأسير ومن ذهبٍ لاحتفال
الوصيفات بالصيف . أَلْفَ سلام عَلَيْكِ
جميعك حافلةً بالمُريدين من كُلِّ جنِّ وإنسِ ,
سلاماً نفسك : دَبُّوسُ شَعْرِكِ يكسر
سيفي وتُرْسي
وزرُّ قميصك يحمل في ضَوْئه
لفظةَ السرِّ للطير من كُلِّ جنسِ ,
خُذي نَفَسِي أَخْذَ جيتارَةٍ تستجيبُ
لما تطلبين من الريح . أَندلسي كُلُّها
في يديك , فلا تَدَعي وَتَراً واحداً
للدفاع عن النفس في أَرْض أَندَلُسِي
سوف أُدرك , في زمن آخر ,
سوف أدرك أَني انتصرتُ بيأسي
وأَني وجدت حياتي , هنالك
خارجها , قرب أَمي
خذي فَرسي
واُذبحيها , لأَحمل نفسيَ حيّاً ومَيْتاً ,
بنفسي…

By Mahmoud Darwish

The Art of Islamic Calligraphy

In the Islamic world calligraphy has been taken far beyond pen and paper it has been explored into all art forms and materials. Nowadays calligraphy may be counted as a uniquely original feature of Islamic art. The genius of Islamic calligraphy lies not only in the endless creativity and versatility, but also in the balance struck by calligraphers between transmitting a text and expressing its meaning through a formal aesthetic code.

The Arabic language, and subsequently the art of calligraphy, is held in great esteem by Muslims because Arabic was the language in which the Qu’ran was revealed to the Prophet Muhammad in the 7th century. The Arabic text of the Qu’ran is sacred to Muslims, and its high status gave rise to an associated respect for books in general.

However, it is important to remember that while the Qu’ran’s holy status provides an explanation for calligraphy’s importance, by no means all Arabic calligraphy is religious in content. In general, calligraphic inscriptions on works of art comprise one or more of the following types of text such as: Qu’ranic quotations, other religious texts, poems, praise for rulers and aphorisms. These types of texts can be explored and seen through all types of art forms ranging from historical Islamic calligraphy to the present interpretation of calligraphy.

Ink on parchment-Before the invention of paper, vellum or parchment was the highest quality writing material available. It was made from prepared animal hide. A reed pen, with the tip cut at an angle and filled with ink, would have been used. Writing on vellum can be erased or altered.

Ink on paper-calligraphy would often be created using a reed pen and ink directly onto starched and polished paper, which provides an excellent smooth surface for writing.

Ceramics-The calligraphy tile pictured above was deeply carved with the inscriptions (and plant designs) and covered with coloured glazes, before the final firing. This technique was used in Central Asia only for a brief period, from around 1350 to the early 1600s.

Wood- letters are often carved with sharp metal tool and later painted.

Textiles- often written with ink on finer materials such as fine silks and satin the picture above with Arabic in scripted calligraphy states ‘Glory to our lord the sultan’.

Enamelled glass-The above image of the lamp was made by blowing hot glass into shape and then leaving it to cool. The enamel colours and gilding were then painted on – the enamel was a solution of colours and ground glass that melted and fused on to the lamp when it was reheated in a kiln. The blown glass would have been decorated with enamel and gilt, possibly using fine brushes.

Metalwork-the casket pictured above was chiselled out taking out areas of brass surface then filled with pieces of silver and gold. They added details by chasing the surfaces of the softer inlaid metals with a hammer and tools and adding a black filler to create contrast.

Trend Alert: Backpack Traveller

The minute that Cara Delevingne sauntered out onto the Chanel spring/summer 14 catwalk carrying a graffiti-sprayed backpack, our love affair with the humble rucksack was reignited. While Chanel’s version is a whopping £2,245 Salaam Style found 10 stylish high street back packs that would add a great retro traveller look to any hijabi outfit this Spring/ summer why not explore this trendy new accessory?

 

The tale of Marrakech

As the Easter holiday is speedily approaching it is time to travel, unwind and most importantly get away from work…work…work. Marrakech is a place full of culture and vibrant colours at Salaam Style HQ we look back at a tale behind our most favourite, statement jewellery pieces.

It was the third day of my Easter holiday that I had long awaited for. The scent of strong home grown coffee steamed through the café I was sitting in. Plates hung on the wall full of swirly intricate detailing as I embraced the art such beautiful setting around an open space a strong male figure blocked my view his hand reached out to me this was after all Marrakech and I was sitting in the middle of a market.

As he opened his hand the jewellery was full of uniqueness. You’re probably thinking ‘hmm I do see Moroccan jewellery in London’s Camden market’ however these pieces had a lot more significance as a followed the gentlemen to his stall I saw two workers at the back hand crafting necklaces with they’re very hand no I asked the gentlemen how did you make all of this fresh jewellery that hung he pointed at a  a tray of metal tools.

The jewellery explored different metals different gems and different carved detailing. Inspiration of the eastern culture crept out through every piece of jewellery. I was a long way from home in the perfect setting to embrace the beauty of such a culture.

Jewellery is a statement and in every piece I seem to understand thoroughly now all of the work was put in to be proud of once I was wearing the jewellery we are embracing a culture with such skill. The limitation of one tool that produced such eye-catching exceptional jewellery I taken away with me a few pieces that I would forever treasure the prints and stunning qualities are an instant reminder of the tale behind the craft of the jewellery I wear.

Art behind Afghanistan

Where is the art behind Afghanistan? This rhetoric in such a contemporary society can only be answered by people who know about the culture of Afghanistan and its significance. Some people may not know, but Afghans do actually have their own unique fashion forms, their own clothing and their own jewellery.

To get the world to notice the beauty behind afghan art fashion designer Zolaykha Sherzad’s label Zarif Design explores the distinctive qualities of such an intriguing culture. Zarif Design means “precious” in Dari with a mission to preserve and merge Afghan traditions and culture with the elegant designs of today.

This belief is showcased through the distinctive, drawing on the rich cultural heritage of Afghanistan with intricate detailing and unique fabrics. The works of Zoloykha Sherzad proves every culture has a significant history of art behind it. It is the exploration beyond the Burqa and the Hijab where you truly develop an understanding behind the culture of Afghanistan.

“I want to show people that Afghanistan is not all about war, orphanages and Burqas. It’s also about textiles, history and culture. It’s about beauty.” – Zolaykha Sherzad.

Zolaykha Sherzad’s recent fashion show explored women’s traditional Afghan clothes made through coloured silk with hand embroidered designs on top and rich silver metal crafted jewellery. The traditional Afghan clothing consists of a long length dress or kameez with a loose trouser or partug. Through the traditional Afghan clothing colour of the kameez is always different to the partug.

Overall the Afghan attire is a unique piece of art full of an oasis of colours, textures, variety of fabrics and exquisite hand embroidery. Zolaykha Sherzad helps express this view what lies behind the burqa/ hijab is the artistic traditional fashion forms of Afghanistan that will never fade.

The art behind Afghanistan Not anonymity but rather identity

Zolaykha Sherzad’s designs are currently on sale in a French boutique called Agnes B in Marylebone High Street, Fenwick and Bond Street, London. 

Look for Less! Victoria Beckham does casual

Victoria Beckham will always remain a fashion inspiration from her statement dresses to her killer heels she’s always wowing the nation with her sleek looks. Earlier in the day she was spotted touching down in South Africa, looking effortlessly chic in her casual but statement choice of clothing.

At Salaam Style HQ we loved VB’s style that turned stripe into statement. So we put it together  the look for less that you can get from your nearest high street. We also added the soft  floral scarf giving a true vibe of spring creating a great Hijabi look.