Tag Archives: Hijab Fashion

A self-confessed ‘style hauler’ Dina Tokio the inspiration behind hijabi fashion

Dina Tokio a 24 year old social media sensation, fashion vlogger, designer and vintage extremist from Cardiff, proves how the hijab is a representation of modernity and modesty through her works. The stylish and relaxed cosmopolitan Muslim style icon has established herself as a dominant figure within hijabi centred fashion since rising to fame in 2010 showcasing her first designs through social media.

Her state of the art designs and inspiration behind hijabi fashion has changed the nation’s perception on the hijab. Dina says “I wore the Hijab at quite a young age but I didn’t care about how I presented it, until I hit the age of 17 I valued the importance of the hijab and living in a country surrounded by great artist and fashion designers I wanted to express myself through the hijab. I also started designing hijab wear at A-level stage of my course.”

Dina has designed hijab wear for over seven years, embracing the concept and the art behind Muslim women of today. Her designs are fresh and vibrant; Dina uses traditional techniques to create modern contemporary looks. All of the hijab’s Dina creates are handmade and showcased through her website Lazy Doll and also through social networking sites.

Her fearless, fun and statement looks celebrate vintage aesthetics and qualities. She says “the ‘bintage and vintage’ page on my website provides the perfect pieces at the perfect prices. I have a love for vintage clothing and have embraced it through offering inspiration from the 20’s all the way till the 90’s.”

With the rise of hijab wear Dina states “It is much easier now to shop and create modest looks through western high street stores… you are free to express yourself.” She is currently working on her latest collection where she has partnered up with another designer that will be released by the end of the year.

Focusing on a chic and contemporary twist combined with sublime colours and luxurious fabrics, Dina says “I want to make every piece as different and unique from the last, I am constantly developing my looks to fit the ultimate Lazy Doll. One of my biggest fashion inspiration is Rabia Z I love her work and take it on board through my personal style.”

To find out more about her unique style through  DINA TOKI-O

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Fashion Designer: Rabia Zargarpur on why ‘modesty is always in style’

United Arab Emirates based fashion designer Rabia Zargarpur who owns the world renowned label Rabia Z proves how modesty is always in style in her latest S/S14 collection.

Rabia has always depicted the hijab as a significant piece within her wardrobe whilst donning the hijab during her studies in the US. Rabia came to terms post 9/11 attacks on the hijab her response was to ‘design creative outfits for the modern Muslim woman.

Through her own incorporation of the hijab Rabia soon let it be heard as liberating modest fashion piece. Rabia recalls ‘It kind of became like a conversation piece and just like that I was able to give them this insight on hijab and Muslim women.’

Growing up in the UAE, Rabia designed clothes using her mother’s manufacturing unit. After completing a business degree, she studied fashion in New York. Years of researching and branding later, she created demand for her designs and finally launched her label Rabia Z online in 2007.

A creator in modestly-chic clothing, Rabia has collections that consist of colourful abayas and ready-to-wear outfits, including everything from casual to luxurious eveningwear. Her latest S/S14 designs from the Mukhawara Collection are inspired by the traditional dress, the Mukhawara, influenced by her rich Afghan-Arab heritage.

Rabia states, “I promote modesty…the fact is that we have to live in this life, in this society and in these trying times. Our Prophet Muhammad (peace be upon him) has said to choose moderation and that’s what I see.”

Hijab Center of Attention at Tokyo Fashion Week!

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Aspiring Asian fashion designers taken centre stage at  Tokyo fashion week from Revived  sharp detail forms to sophisticated slouch. Every garment had an awe of precision.  One of the most striking was an Indonesian label’s bid to blend a traditional Muslim head scarf with haute couture.

The twice-yearly show, which wrapped up today, saw NurZahra roll out its autumn/winter collection “Layers of Fidelity,” turning the modest hijab into sophisticated fashion.

the meaning of the labels name itself stands for a “ luminous light” in Arabic.
“The modest hijab is not actually a restriction” in fashion, designer Windri Widiesta Dhari told reporters after her stylish designs hit the catwalk.

It’s how you cover yourself and look more elegant in a way that has a loose fit.”
But Dhari sees the traditional scarf as not just a modesty covering, but also a stylish, comfortable accessory.

“We want to inspire people to think that wearing hijab is not something difficult, and could be worn by anyone,” she said.

Her collection also bucks a contemporary design trend for simplicity and minimalism.Blending cotton or silk into her hijab, she includes natural dye prints that rely on a traditional Japanese tie-dye technique called shibori and the Indonesian batik method.

With patterns ranging from mini mandalas to Turkish geometrics, Dhari plays with multiple layers of fabric to freely shape her silhouettes. Another eye-catching element of the collection was a hat that spreads wide in the back, a throwback to the sixties with elements resembling a long-ago royal head piece.

“The concept of the hat was actually inspired by the style in one from 1963,” Dhari said. “I was looking for vintage hats that could be used to cover your hair and also your neck.

“I used that inspiration and then mixed it with a traditional ethnic concept, so it becomes something very unique.”

Tokyo certainly ended on a high note portraying fashion has no limitation and just how much there is to explore. Fashion designers including NurZahra, breathed this vibe and showcased there efforts to make a statement.

Captured in focus the evolution of the Hijab

British artist Sara Shamsavari proves how the hijab is far from oppressing for Muslim women in her latest photo series. She explores the hijab as an artistic fashionable and creative expression, bringing a fresh perspective to the discourse surrounding it.

Shamsavari, who is a non-Muslim of Iranian descent, wants to challenge stereotypes and invite engagement in the presence of the hijab. She wants her project to discuss the hijab “beyond differences.” She adds “a person should have the right to choose their expression and it seems this group of people are targeted with a lot of prejudice and abuse in the west.”

Shamsavari’s London based photo series proves the hijab and fashion are not mutually exclusive in fact, Muslim women can use it to express themselves in a way most fashion bloggers can’t.

She states the photo series was inspired by her own experience growing up in London in the 80s and 90s. Despite her blue eyes and fair skin, Shamsavari’s Iranian background meant she became accustomed to name calling. Yet this prejudice only fed her desire to focus on what she calls “uncelebrated communities” in her work.

She said,“With all depictions of ethnic minorities there is too much negativity and too many clichés and stereotypes. I wanted to do something that was the opposite.”

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